Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Coinbase Has A New Plan For Dealing With Office SJWs: Pay Them To Leave | Zero Hedge

The CEO of Coinbase, Brian Armstrong, has devised an interesting strategy for getting rid of crusading SJW employees, like the rebellious workers creating headaches for Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg for not being "woke" enough.

Pay them to leave.

via www.zerohedge.com

Or, you could fire them.

September 30, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (1)

The Trump-Biden Debate — Wait But Why

In case you missed it, here’s a transcript of the first Trump-Biden Debate:

via waitbutwhy.com

Heh heh.

September 30, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

The Lesser-Known History of African-American Cowboys

Few images embody the spirit of the American West as well as the trailblazing, sharpshooting, horseback-riding cowboy of American lore. And though African-American cowboys don’t play a part in the popular narrative, historians estimate that one in four cowboys were black. 

via getpocket.com

September 30, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (1)

A new academic paper explains how anarchists use social media to instigate violence

A white paper published by academic authors from Rutgers University looks closely at the ways anarchists use social media to organize and instigate violence against their targets. The paper is titled “Network-Enabled Anarchy: How Militant Anarcho-Socialist Networks Use Social Media to Instigate Widespread Violence Against Political Opponents and Law Enforcement” and was published two weeks ago.

via hotair.com

September 30, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tapper to Harris: Why won't Biden -- or you -- "give a straight answer" on court packing?

Because the question puts Joe Biden and Kamala Harris between a rock and a hard place, and everyone knows it. Members of their own party in the Senate have floated the idea of packing the court if Democrats win the election and take control of Washington. That would require a bill to pass Congress and a president to sign the bill, and it would dramatically remake the Article III branch of government. That makes it a top-tier presidential-election issue, and Joe Biden knows it.

via hotair.com

September 30, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (1)

Are Limited Terms for Supreme Court Justices Constitutional?
Michael Ramsey

From Kalvis Golde at SCOTUSblog: House Democrats to introduce new bill for Supreme Court term limits.

With the debate over Supreme Court reform taking center stage in the 2020 election after the passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, three members of the House of Representatives on Tuesday will introduce a bill to establish term limits for Supreme Court justices.

Democrats Ro Khanna (Calif.), Don Beyer (Va.) and Joe Kennedy III (Mass.) unveiled the bill, the Supreme Court Term Limits and Regular Appointments Act, on Friday. If passed, the act would institute regular appointments to the Supreme Court every two years, with new justices serving for nonrenewable 18-year terms. After 18 years, appointees would become “senior justices” able to temporarily rejoin the court in the event of an unexpected vacancy. Although the current eight justices would be exempted, the two-year appointment cycle would take effect immediately, without waiting for them to retire.

The consensus of legal scholars seems to be that this is unconstitutional if done by statute.  I'd like to be a contrarian and say otherwise, but I can't.  Indeed, I think this is another example (as with the Vice President's tie-breaking power on appointments, discussed here) where the Constitution's text is clear, if read carefully and without a view to evasion.

via originalismblog.typepad.com

September 30, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (1)

California Court Pressed for Last-Minute Bar Exam Alternatives

A group of law school graduates in California is taking another shot at getting changes to the state’s bar exam in the final days before lawyers in training are scheduled to sit for the online test.

The petitioners, affiliated with the group United for Diploma Privilege, on Tuesday asked the state’s highest court to scrap the test and expand a new program allowing graduates to get a limited law license. They want the court to make the exam an open book, “take-home” test in the event that the provisional licensing changes are not adopted.

The exam, set for Oct. 5-6, was postponed and moved online in response to concerns stemming from the coronavirus pandemic.

via www.bloomberglaw.com

September 30, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (1)

How do you measure Everest? It's complicated by frostbite—and politics.

There were no dramatic views taken in or heroic photographs snapped when Khimlal Gautam, a 35-year-old Nepali surveyor and mountaineer, climbed to the top of Mount Everest on May 22, 2019. Gautam and his team had timed their ascent to arrive at around 3 a.m. in the pitch black, when temperatures can plummet to their most lethal, so that they could have the summit to themselves in the midst of one of the busiest climbing seasons in the mountain’s storied history.

On the peak’s highest crest of snow, Gautam, aided by another Nepali surveyor and three Sherpa guides, set up a GPS antenna, which began recording its precise position from a network of satellites. Next, the men deployed ground-penetrating radar to measure the depth of the snow beneath their crampons. The two dark, frigid hours they worked on the world’s highest mountain were not without personal sacrifice: Gautam would later lose a toe to frostbite.

Now more than 15 months later, the results of their efforts—a new official height for Mount Everest—are eagerly anticipated. The project, spearheaded by Nepal’s Survey Department, was intended to pinpoint the summit elevation as accurately as possible with state-of-the-art instruments and techniques but also to make a statement of national pride.

via www.nationalgeographic.com

September 30, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Alexa, do I have COVID-19?

Vocalis, a voice-analysis company with offices in Israel and the United States, had previously built a smartphone app that could detect flare-ups of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by listening for signs that users were short of breath when speaking. The firm wanted to do the same thing with COVID-19. People who had tested positive for the coronavirus could participate simply by downloading a Vocalis research app. Once a day, they fired up the app and spoke into their phones, describing an image aloud and counting from 50 to 70.

Then Vocalis began processing these recordings with its machine-learning system, alongside the voices of people who had tested negative for the disease, in an attempt to identify a voiceprint for the illness. By mid-summer, the firm had more than 1,500 voice samples and a pilot version of a digital COVID-19 screening tool. The tool, which the company is currently testing around the world, is not intended to provide a definitive diagnosis, but to help clinicians triage potential cases, identifying people who might be most in need of testing, quarantine or in-person medical care. “Can we help with our AI algorithm?” asks Tal Wenderow, the president and chief executive of Vocalis. “This is not invasive, it’s not a drug, we’re not changing anything. All you need to do is speak.”

via www.nature.com

And if you do have it, your friendly neighborhood medical SWAT team will pay you a little visit.

September 30, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Proud Boys and Antifa Emerge As The Winners From The Presidential Debate – JONATHAN TURLEY

Last night’s presidential debate left many of us in a deep depression over the state of our politics.  Once again, the duopoly of power in this country has reduced a population of over 300 million to a two subpar choices. President Donald Trump’s conduct and comments have been rightfully denounced while Biden offered little beyond not being President Trump. There were however two clear and surprising winners last night: Proud Boys and Antifa. 

via jonathanturley.org

That's a bingo.

September 30, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)