Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Trump Transition Hints at Wildly Unconventional White House | RealClearPolitics

These hallmark quirks are now weightier in the context of the White House, however, with less than two months until the start of Trump’s presidency. If a transition process can suggest the flavor of the administration to come, many political professionals now predict a wildly unconventional White House at the highest levels, with a tinge of chaos.

via www.realclearpolitics.com

Makes for good internet I guess.

November 29, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (1)

Trump Transition Hints at Wildly Unconventional White House | RealClearPolitics

These hallmark quirks are now weightier in the context of the White House, however, with less than two months until the start of Trump’s presidency. If a transition process can suggest the flavor of the administration to come, many political professionals now predict a wildly unconventional White House at the highest levels, with a tinge of chaos.

via www.realclearpolitics.com

Makes for good internet I guess.

November 29, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (1)

Descriptions of credit card fees are now apparently a free speech issue « Hot Air

In a small town in upstate New York a beauty salon ran into a problem a couple of years ago. They listed their prices up front based on the cash price for services, providing a note saying that there would be an extra fee applied if the customer paid by credit card. They were advised by an attorney to take the sign down or change the wording because they were in violation of the law. That may sound fairly crazy, but it turns out the lawyer was correct and they wound up going to court, claiming that their right of free speech was being impinged. (Route Fifty)

via hotair.com

November 29, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Here's how Trump's HHS pick wants to replace Obamacare | Washington Examiner

By tapping House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Tom Price to serve as his Secretary of Health and Human Services, President-elect Trump has added to his team one of the most serious and knowledgeable Republicans on healthcare policy, and in the process pressed his finger on the scales of the internal GOP debate over how specifically to replace Obamacare.

via www.washingtonexaminer.com

November 29, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

For Bashar al-Assad, Winning the Syrian War May Lead to New Troubles - The New York Times

Yet, Mr. Assad’s victory, if he should achieve it, may well be Pyrrhic: He would rule over an economic wasteland hampered by a low-level insurgency with no end in sight, diplomats and experts in the Middle East and elsewhere say.

via www.nytimes.com

It's O's speciality! Winning by losing! Like leading from behind.

November 29, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Suspect Identified in Ohio State Attack as Abdul Razak Ali Artan - NBC News

Abdul Razak Ali Artan, 18, wrote on what appears to be his Facebook page that he had reached a "boiling point," made a reference to "lone wolf attacks" and cited radical cleric Anwar al-Awlaki.

via www.nbcnews.com

We have got to stop these loony right-wing extremist, militia member kooks from getting their hands on assault weapons. Otherwise the slaughter will never stop. Ban all guns now. The framers would agree if they were around now, which fortunately they are not.

November 29, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Trudeau's turn from cool to laughing stock - Macleans.ca

Trudeau made himself synonymous with Canada. He made Canada cool again. It was fun while it lasted.

via www.macleans.ca

Canada still has great fish.

November 29, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

There's a Word for Your Weird Book Addiction | Acumen | OZY

Shockingly, that’s not the only word the Germans came up with for this particular dependence. There’s also Lesewut (reading rage) and Leserei (reading mania). They all mean the same thing — and they weren’t invented to say anything nice. In fact, Lesesucht and its synonyms came to be in the late 1700s, when a boom in literacy brought on a wave of establishment disapproval. “Before, people read religious texts and practical books,” explains Frank Furedi, author of Power of Reading. “Now they were reading literature.” Establishment minds worried about the tendency of young women to read romance novels and of the underclass’ potential to stay idle while reading novels all day. Disapproval rained down from all over the political spectrum — left-wing commentators worried that the masses were reading trash instead of philosophy, and right-wing thinkers decried the abandonment of the Bible for secular texts.

via www.ozy.com

Those darn Germans.

November 29, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (2)

A Few Notes on the Culture, by Iain M Banks

Education in the Culture is something that never ends; it may be at its most intense in the first tenth or so of an individual's life, but it goes on until death (another subject we'll return to). To live in the Culture is to live in a fundamentally rational civilisation (this may preclude the human species from ever achieving something similar; our history is, arguably, not encouraging in this regard). The Culture is quite self-consciously rational, sceptical, and materialist. Everything matters, and nothing does. Vast though the Culture may be - thirty trillion people, scattered fairly evenly through the galaxy - it is thinly spread, exists for now solely in this one galaxy, and has only been around for an eyeblink, compared to the life of the universe. There is life, and enjoyment, but what of it? Most matter is not animate, most that is animate is not sentient, and the ferocity of evolution pre-sentience (and, too often, post-sentience) has filled uncountable lives with pain and suffering. And even universes die, eventually. (Though we'll come back to that, too.)

via www.vavatch.co.uk

Just the sort of weird thing I post every once in a while. Iain Banks is a thoughtful guy, though sadly, evidently, a socialist.

November 29, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (1)

Monday, November 28, 2016

OECD Says Trump’s Policies Could Lift Global Growth - WSJ

U.S. and global economic growth would be boosted by increases in spending and tax cuts promised by President-elect Donald Trump, but those gains would be lost if he pressed ahead with threatened tariff increases that triggered retaliation, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development said Monday.

During his campaign, Mr. Trump pledged to boost infrastructure spending by as much as $1 trillion, although the details of how that would be financed are sketchy. He has also promised to cut corporate and personal income taxes.

via www.wsj.com

It seems like Krugman would agree with this, but mysteriously he does not. He probably thinks all this spending will just go into the pockets of cronies, which actually does seem likely. Wrong pockets, I guess. And he doesn't like the tax cuts, which let people keep money they earned instead of got from the government, in some cases.

November 28, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)