Tuesday, April 24, 2007

Where is the outrage?
Mike Rappaport

It is not just in Europe:

A community debate over religious freedom surfaced in Western Pennsylvania last week when Dutch feminist author Ayaan Hirsi Ali, a Somali refugee who has lived under the threat of death for denouncing her Muslim upbringing, made an appearance at the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown.

Imam Fouad ElBayly, president of the Johnstown Islamic Center, was among those who objected to Hirsi Ali's appearance.

"She has been identified as one who has defamed the faith. If you come into the faith, you must abide by the laws, and when you decide to defame it deliberately, the sentence is death," said ElBayly, who came to the U.S. from Egypt in 1976.

Although ElBayly believes a death sentence is warranted for Hirsi Ali, he stressed that America is not the jurisdiction where such a crime should be punished. Instead, Hirsi Ali should be judged in a Muslim country after being given a trial, he added.

"If it is found that a person is mentally unstable, or a child or disabled, there should be no punishment," he said. "It's a very merciful religion if you try to understand it."

When a religious leader in the United States makes a statement like this, there should be strong reactions and protests.   The religious leader and his congregation should be made to understand that people in the United States believe that killing people for their beliefs or comments about a religion is an outrageous violation of rights and that it undermines the freedom and harmony that the United States system promotes.   It is amazing that the nation goes crazy when Don Imus insults people but seems to say nothing when religious leaders advocate the killing of people because they are perceived to have insulted Islam.

(Hat tip: Glenn Reynolds)

https://rightcoast.typepad.com/rightcoast/2007/04/where_is_the_ou.html

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Mike Rappaport
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Comments

Maybe if the Iman had a very popular radio show that reached millions where top politicians regularly appeared there would be more outrage? As it is I suspect that most people haven't heard of it (I hadn't) and, while they would find it awful they'd also rightly see it as small-scale and somewhat isolated.

Posted by: Matt | Apr 24, 2007 5:26:28 AM

The camel's nose is under the tent. And we are doing what, exactly?
'It is a trick among the dishonest to offer sacrifices that are not needed, or not possible, to avoid making those that are required.' Goncharov
'It asks a strong wit and a strong heart to know when to tell the truth, and to do it; therefore, it is the weaker sort of politicians that are the great dissemblers.' Francis Bacon

Posted by: james wilson | Apr 24, 2007 8:17:41 AM

The Left (including the MSM) is too focused on the horrid evil Christians (who wold oppose gay marriage etc.) to look at their purported friends the Muslims (who would execute gays, etc.). Willful blindness.

Posted by: km | Apr 24, 2007 10:45:33 AM

Matt -- that you hadn't heard about it is the point. Most people hadn't heard Imus make his statement either. Instead, it was repeated in the media until you had. So what you consider small scale is a function of what is reported. And let me tell you, there is no comparison between the two statements.

Posted by: Michael Rappaport | Apr 24, 2007 11:41:29 AM

But why was Imus's remark reported? Because he's famous and had a huge radio show that many politicians and the like go one. If that were not the case, if he'd been some radio guy in podunk PA, it would not have been reported. If this Iman had a huge radio show it would have been reported. This is quite obviously the difference between the two.

Posted by: Matt | Apr 24, 2007 5:59:43 PM

Hmmm...I did a Google search and the first 30 or so entries appear to denounce the Imam's actions, some with very strong language. And it seems most of the entries appeared in the last 48 hours. A ground swell of 'outrage' might be building because of the blogosphere, just like in the Imus case.

Posted by: David C. Brayton | Apr 24, 2007 9:21:18 PM

Where_is_the_ou.. He-he-he :)

Posted by: rightcoast.typepad.com | Jun 18, 2011 12:16:21 AM