The Right Coast

Editor: Thomas A. Smith
University of San Diego
School of Law

A Member of the Law Professor Blogs Network

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

We’re in the third biggest stock bubble in U.S. history - Brett Arends's ROI - MarketWatch

U.S. stocks are now about 80% overvalued on certain key long-term measures, according to research by financial consultant Andrew Smithers, the chairman of Smithers & Co. and one of the few to warn about the bubble of the late 1990s at the time.

via www.marketwatch.com

Bummer.

July 15, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (1)

Appeals Court: Texas Can Use Race in Admissions - ABC News

In a 2-1 ruling, judges from the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals found that barring the university from using race would ultimately lead to a less diverse student body in defiance of previous legal precedent that promoting diversity was an important part of education.

via abcnews.go.com

July 15, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (1)

The VA Scandal Just Keeps Spreading - NationalJournal.com

The scandal that erupted over allegations of data manipulation at the Veterans Affairs Department's medical facility in Phoenix has now spread to the VA's disability claims.

via www.nationaljournal.com

July 15, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Mr. 'I, Me, My': Obama Oughta Know He's Not the Hero - NationalJournal.com

The Democrat shook his head. "That's the problem with this White House. Barack Obama is the hero of their narrative, but he's not supposed to be," he said. "The hero of every political narrative should be the voters."

via www.nationaljournal.com

He's the hero of a boring story.

July 15, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Prof. Philip Hamburger (Columbia), guest-blogging, on his “Is Administrative Law Unlawful?” - The Washington Post

I’m delighted to report that Prof. Philip Hamburger of Columbia Law School — a leading scholar of constitutional law and constitutional history — will be guest-blogging this coming week on his new book, Is Administrative Law Unlawful?:

via www.washingtonpost.com

I've read the first chapter and it looks really, really good.

July 15, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0)

The Strange Leak of the New Exposé ‘Clinton, Inc.’ - The Daily Beast

Perhaps surprisingly, it’s Bill Clinton who emerges as selfish and coldly calculating in the portrait drawn by Halper’s reporting, and Hillary who comes off as warm and caring, albeit charmingly transactional for political gain, particularly with her Republican colleagues in the Senate. All the Clintons are described as obsessed with enriching themselves, using their charitable foundation and the Clinton Global Initiative not only to perform good works but also to help support an imperial lifestyle and provide Hillary’s presidential ambitions with a vast political infrastructure.

via www.thedailybeast.com

Ah, Bill.

July 15, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Why Obama won't take strong action in border crisis | WashingtonExaminer.com

So chalking up the president's performance to incompetence doesn't tell the whole story. Everybody who really matters to the president, politically and perhaps emotionally, is pushing against strong action at the border. Why would he alienate them, and ignore his own inclinations, to do what Republicans want?

via washingtonexaminer.com

Bingo.

July 15, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0)

We Are Our Bacteria - NYTimes.com

In his new book, “Missing Microbes,” Dr. Blaser links the declining variety within the microbiome to our increased susceptibility to serious, often chronic conditions,  from allergies and celiac disease to Type 1 diabetes and obesity. He and others primarily blame antibiotics for the connection.

via well.blogs.nytimes.com

I smell a new trend.

July 15, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Scientists Are Beginning To Figure Out Why Conservatives Are…Conservative | Mother Jones

The occasion of this revelation is a paper by John Hibbing of the University of Nebraska and his colleagues, arguing that political conservatives have a "negativity bias," meaning that they are physiologically more attuned to negative (threatening, disgusting) stimuli in their environments. In the process, Hibbing et al. marshall a large body of evidence, including their own experiments using eye trackers and other devices to measure the involuntary responses of political partisans to different types of images. One finding? That conservatives respond much more rapidly to threatening and aversive stimuli (for instance, images of "a very large spider on the face of a frightened person, a dazed individual with a bloody face, and an open wound with maggots in it," as one of their papers put it.)

via www.motherjones.com

This story is absolutely revolting.

July 15, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0)

We Can See Political Bias From Space - World leaders illuminate their hometowns like a Lite-Brite, researchers claim

(Newser) – Deceased dictator Mobutu Sese Seko wanted his hometown to shine brighter than the diamonds he ransacked from the Congo’s coffers—and he apparently isn’t the only world leader to shed some light (and money and resources) on his birthplace. Researchers say that political favoritism can, as LiveScience puts it, "literally be seen from space." The home regions of leaders become brighter at night after they come into power—and then appear to fade back to black after the leader dies, retires, or is otherwise deposed.

via www.newser.com

July 15, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0)