The Right Coast

Editor: Thomas A. Smith
University of San Diego
School of Law

A Member of the Law Professor Blogs Network

Sunday, January 31, 2016

Police 'should threaten to shoot migrants': AFD - The Local

Border police "should be able if need be to have recourse to their firearms -- as laid down by law," the paper quoted Petry as saying.
 
"No policeman wants to fire on a refugee and I don't want that either. But as a last resort there should be recourse to firearms," said Petry in comments which drew a storm of criticism.

via www.thelocal.de

January 31, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Phase of the moon affects amount of rainfall

When the moon is high in the sky, it creates bulges in the planet's atmosphere that creates imperceptible changes in the amount of rain that falls below.

via phys.org

The other I heard a law student ask if perhaps there weren't more full moons lately. It seemed to her every time she looked up, there was a full moon. She wasn't talking to me, but I could not help emitting a noise, something like "Yaaeeee!" Difficult to render precisely. I wanted to say something like, yes, in the same way it is twelve o'clock more frequently lately. But she was very stylish and I was cowed into silence.

January 31, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (1)

What are we to make of Trump's blue-collar support? - LA Times

Still, there remains the vexing question of how a billionaire demagogue can win the loyalty of the very people whose class interests he opposes. What possible sense can we make of blue-collar workers of any age, gender or race supporting a man whose very existence rests on their exploitation and, increasingly, on their obsolescence? It boggles the mind, or so we like to pretend.

via www.latimes.com

January 31, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Dithering as the Shadows Grow - The American Interest

There’s been a lot of talk about a bubble in Chinese stocks, but, as this story suggests, stock prices have largely underperformed given China’s growth. With twenty years of world beating growth rates, the Chinese stock market should have made even more millionaires than it has. One big reason for this is the role of politics in the Initial Public Offering approval process.

via www.the-american-interest.com

January 31, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

‘This was all planned’: Former IG says Hillary, State Dept. are lying | New York Post

Still, “It will never get to an indictment,” Krongard said.

For one, he says, any criminal referral to the Justice Department from the FBI “will have to go through four loyal Democrat women” — Assistant Attorney General Leslie Caldwell, who heads the department’s criminal division; Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates; Attorney General Loretta Lynch; and top White House adviser Valerie Jarrett.

Even if they accept the referral, he says, the case quickly and quietly will be plea-bargained down to misdemeanors punishable by fines in a deal similar to the one Clinton’s lawyer, David Kendall, secured for Gen. David Petraeus. In other words, a big slap on the wrist.

“He knows the drill,” Krongard said of Kendall.

via nypost.com

This seems right. Well, wrong, but correct.

January 31, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

The explosive science of genetics - The Globe and Mail

But genetic denialism has its own risks. One risk is that by not acknowledging the importance of heritability, a lot of social science research is misleading and useless. And many of the policies it has inspired won’t work.

Today the social sciences face a deepening crisis of legitimacy – largely because social scientists, who are overwhelmingly liberal, can’t bring themselves to acknowledge what’s staring them in the face. Yet good social policy depends on it. Dr. Plomin believes this is especially true in education, which should be both more effective and more humane. “It does poor service to social change to subordinate truth to politics,” he says.

With the revolutionary new techniques that have been developed for exploring the human genome, the cascade of findings in behavioural genetics will be increasingly difficult to ignore. They’ll be controversial, but also liberating. Meanwhile, you can focus on the good news: Whatever’s wrong with your kids is probably not your fault.

via www.theglobeandmail.com

And not just your kids either.

January 31, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Serfs up with California's new feudalism - The Orange County Register

In contrast, California’s new conservatism, often misleadingly called progressivism, seeks to prevent change by discouraging everything – from the construction of new job-generating infrastructure to virtually any kind of family-friendly housing. The resulting ill-effects on the state’s enormous population of poor and near-poor – roughly-one third of households – have been profound, although widely celebrated by the state’s gentry class.

via www.ocregister.com

January 31, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

What Next for the Left? | The Weekly Standard

This understanding of the counterculture shapes the environment governing student life at many of the nation's universities. Millennials demand full personal liberty while expecting complete security. Security consists of protection not only from physical menace, but from psychological discomfort. Universities are asked to meet these demands, which they do by creating infrastructures of psychological counselors, sensitivity trainers, and police (the last often disguised under a euphemistic title). These mechanisms of control are justified initially on the "negative" grounds of providing security, but they soon expand to serve the "positive" purpose of changing the culture to promote progressive ends. National administration is a full partner in this bureaucratic expansion, most recently in the area of relations among the sexes. Beginning from a supposed security concern — a government-sponsored survey finding that "one in five women is sexually assaulted in college" — universities, with backing and encouragement from federal agencies, are implementing elaborate rules for courtship and controlling the approved stages of touching. The Department of Education has mandated the establishment of what amounts to a new national court system for college students to mete out punishments for sexual misconduct. In loco parentis was shown the front door at most universities in the 1960s, in loco administratis has been brought in the back door in the 2010s. For a generation that has canonized freedom and self-expression, the degree of surveillance that it countenances invites bewilderment. The progressive idea of liberty increasingly resembles life in The Truman Show.

via www.weeklystandard.com

The piece by James Ceaser is very good indeed. But long. But nevertheless I advise, RTWT.

January 31, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Mind the endangered species on McGinty Mountain | San Diego Reader

McGinty Mountain lies within a collective ecological preserve managed by the Nature Conservancy, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s San Diego National Wildlife Refuge. Several rare and endangered plant species make their home here on a relatively uncommon type of soil known as gabbro. These soils occur in fault zones, primarily in the Coast Range of California and the western Sierra Nevada foothills. They are characterized by having low levels of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, the major nutrients required by plants. In addition, they contain high levels of iron and heavy metals such as nickel, chromium, and cobalt, which are toxic to most plants.

via www.sandiegoreader.com

McGinty Mountain is right near my house and I hike up there quite a bit. Ain't boastin' iffen it's true.

January 31, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Route revealed for big Amgen cycling race | SanDiegoUnionTribune.com

Other highlights of the 106-mile local stage, which will be broadcast worldwide on May 15, include undulating rides through rural areas near Otay Lake, west of Barrett Lake, just south of Alpine and through El Cajon.

via www.sandiegouniontribune.com

Maybe I'll watch it on TV.

January 31, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)