The Right Coast

Editor: Thomas A. Smith
University of San Diego
School of Law

A Member of the Law Professor Blogs Network

Saturday, May 31, 2014

Heh

May 31, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (1)

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Donald Sterling’s LA Clippers sold for $2 billion to former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer: report - NY Daily News

Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has apparently won the bidding war Thursday for the Los Angeles Clippers with a staggering $2 billion offer for the NBA franchise, according to the L.A. Times.

via www.nydailynews.com

Maybe he knows more about basketball than software.

May 29, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Scientists achieve reliable quantum teleportation for first time - CNET

Now, scientists have successfully hijacked that quantum weirdness -- doing so reliably for the first time -- to produce what many sci-fi fans have long dreamt up: teleportation. No, not beaming humans aboard the USS Enterprise, but the teleportation of data.

via www.cnet.com

Really?

May 29, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Five Movies Rick Santorum Should Make Tomorrow | The American Spectator

argued last week that Rick Santorum ought to drop any pretense of a long-shot 2016 presidential bid to focus on turning EchoLight Studios, the filmmaking outfit he runs, into the next blockbuster factory. That generated a bit of a discussion with Quin Hillyer, one of Santorum’s more well-known supporters (a summation of which can be found here)—but it’s worth exploring further how Santorum could make an impact upstream from politics.

via spectator.org

May 29, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0)

RealClearWorld - Cardinal Richelieu's Unconventional Morality

Richelieu lacked universalist ideals, it is true. And thus he can be smugly denounced from the vantage point of the 21st century West, which has the luxury to focus on such ideals. But Richelieu, like most leaders, should be judged by the values and contingencies of his own time and not by ours. And the highest values of his time were about creating a political structure to replace the anarchy that had led to the Thirty Years' War. Writing of Friedrich Schiller's interpretation of Habsburg commander Albrecht von Wallenstein, Hill notes that "grand ideals" can be served by "immoral acts of statecraft." To wit, it may be provocative to listen to the vulgar language of Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger on White House tapes, but the two men, in my opinion, should be judged by the truth of their geopolitical conceptions and their determined ability to carry them out.

via www.realclearworld.com

As I read this I thought, he sounds like he talking about Kissinger, and sure enough, he is! I don't think this is really about the 17th century. I don't know what Cardinal R was like, beyond my mental picture of Charleton Heston in scarlet. But I doubt he was much like Kissinger either. Also, I am just so tired of these reason of state arguments. I pompously intone, And yet, when one considers the global econo-socio-politico-dialectical implications of his blah blah blah . . . No, no, no. Probably Cardinal R thought he was doing the right thing from where he stood, but many thousands, or hundreds of thousands of people died for his pet theory. He just didn't care about the little people, and neither evidently does Robert Kaplan.

May 29, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Maya Angelou: Still She Rises | RealClearPolitics

On Wednesday, President Obama lauded her as “one of the brightest lights of our time -- a brilliant writer, a fierce friend, and a truly phenomenal woman.” In a written statement issued at the White House, the president quoted a line that Angelou herself had applied to Nelson Mandela upon his death: “No sun outlasts its sunset, but will rise again, and bring the dawn.”

via www.realclearpolitics.com

Well, speak none but good of the dead they say, but here I prefer the British tradition of the merciless obituary. Dr. Angelou may have been a fantastic person, I really don't know, but she was not a great poet or any kind of poet for my money. Her name appearing on a college reading list just about guaranteed the list was a flinger, i.e. that which should be flung into the bush. That thing she read at President Clinton's inaugruation was just awful. But fine, she's dead. I'm sure her family will miss her. I can't write poetry either.

May 29, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Are we all racist now? - Telegraph

“Heinrich HIMMLER,” said Himself, “was a foul, Jew-exterminating, Nazi fiend whom your grandmother’s parents and their whole generation fought a world war to defeat in order that she could sit here 70 years later and be called racist by her sanctimonious and ungrateful grandchildren. Anyone for crumble?”

via www.telegraph.co.uk

May 29, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (1)

U.S. Economy Shrank at 1 Percent Rate in Q1 | RealClearPolitics

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy was battered even more than first suspected by the harsh winter, actually shrinking from January through March. But economists are confident the contraction was temporary.

The economy contracted at an annual rate of 1 percent in the first quarter, the Commerce Department said Thursday. That was worse than the government's initial estimate last month that gross domestic product grew by a barely discernible 0.1 percent in the first quarter. It was the economy's first quarterly decline since a 1.3 percent drop in the first three months of 2011.

via www.realclearpolitics.com

This what happens when you try to tax and regulate an economy into prosperity. It would be funny, except for the consequences.

May 29, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Joseph Bast and Roy Spencer: The Myth of the Climate Change '97%' - WSJ.com

Yet the assertion that 97% of scientists believe that climate change is a man-made, urgent problem is a fiction. The so-called consensus comes from a handful of surveys and abstract-counting exercises that have been contradicted by more reliable research.

via webcache.googleusercontent.com

May 28, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Towards a theory of cool

Huh.  Kinda interesting.  But did Plato and Aristotle think that humor was merely of the superiority sort? That accounts for some humor, but if they thought that was it, that's not even funny.  Are the Greeks like the Germans (just kidding!) where their idea of funny is, what, "The old lady fell down the stairs and broke both legs!  Ha Ha!" Not all Germans of course. Or any Germans.  I'm just kidding. Really. I'm sorry.

May 28, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0)