The Right Coast

Editor: Thomas A. Smith
University of San Diego
School of Law

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Thursday, August 1, 2013

Coburn: "We Wouldn't Be $17 Trillion In Debt If We Actually Followed The Constitution" | RealClearPolitics

COBURN: I think the number one thing they don't pay attention to is the U.S. Constitution and the enumerated powers enlisted in there in the 10th Amendment. That's what they're not paying attention to. I'm going to introduce the Enumerated Powers Act today. It has 35 cosponsors but there's not one Democrat on there. All it says is when you're going to pass a bill, justify it by relating to the constitution where you get the power to do that. Because we wouldn't be $17 trillion in debt if we actually followed the constitution. What our founders set as a very limited government. We wouldn't be there. We are in a mess. I call it the kindergarten in Washington because we really lack leadership and what we have is selfish desires for political power, rather than thoughtful consideration about what's in the best long-term interest of our country as a whole and what are we putting at risk when we don't have the leadership that redirects us to think long term and also think in terms of the limited government. I think our kids are a great risk right now.

via www.realclearpolitics.com

A little truthiness, but I fear it falls on inattentive ears. --ts

http://rightcoast.typepad.com/rightcoast/2013/08/coburn-we-wouldnt-be-17-trillion-in-debt-if-we-actually-followed-the-constitution-realclearpolitics.html

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Comments

as long as the bread and circuses schtick keeps rolling, not many will care.

Posted by: titan | Aug 2, 2013 9:31:16 AM

So, what is he saying? that it's unconstitutional to have deficits? that Social Security and Medicare are unconstitutional? maybe Right Coast should have included more of Coburn's speech.

Posted by: Kieth | Aug 2, 2013 11:45:23 AM

Another way to look at these issues is to say that the Constitution, fascinating historical document though it be, is essentially a failure. Sometimes the failure is acute - as in the obvious way it fails to cope with sudden shocks, from the Louisiana Purchase, to the Civil War, to WWI and WWII, to the War on Turr. Often the failure is chronic, as in the growth and growth of the spendthrift state. But essentially it shows that the idea of a Constitution codified in a single, hard-to-amend, document, is terribly flawed - or, at least, that that one is.

Posted by: dearieme | Aug 3, 2013 3:44:36 PM