The Right Coast

Editor: Thomas A. Smith
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Thursday, November 29, 2012

More on the President’s veto bluff | Keith Hennessey

Yesterday I argued that the President is bluffing on his veto threat. Today I want to respond to some great feedback from friends and readers. Warning: discussions of negotiating strategy and tactics can get a little dense.

via keithhennessey.com

November 29, 2012 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Fall 2012 1L Enrollment Down 9%; 75% of Law Schools Experienced Declines

ABA Section of Legal Education, Preliminary Fall 2012 First-Year Enrollment Data:

Early review of data on first-year enrollments at ABA-approved law schools reveals that 44,481 full-time and part-time students began their law school studies in the fall of 2012. This represents a decrease of 4,216 students (9%) from the fall of 2011 and is approximately 15% below the historic high 1L enrollment of 52,488 in the fall of 2010. ...

via taxprof.typepad.com

November 29, 2012 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

The Myth of American Meritocracy | The American Conservative

Taken in combination, these trends all provide powerful evidence that over the last decade or more there has been a dramatic collapse in Jewish academic achievement, at least at the high end.

via www.theamericanconservative.com

November 28, 2012 | Permalink | Comments (1)

The Myth of American Meritocracy | The American Conservative

Even more surprising has been the sheer constancy of these percentages, with almost every year from 1995–2011 showing an Asian enrollment within a single point of the 16.5 percent average, despite huge fluctuations in the number of applications and the inevitable uncertainty surrounding which students will accept admission. By contrast, prior to 1993 Asian enrollment had often changed quite substantially from year to year. It is interesting to note that this exactly replicates the historical pattern observed by Karabel, in which Jewish enrollment rose very rapidly, leading to imposition of an informal quota system, after which the number of Jews fell substantially, and thereafter remained roughly constant for decades. On the face of it, ethnic enrollment levels which widely diverge from academic performance data or application rates and which remain remarkably static over time provide obvious circumstantial evidence for at least a de facto ethnic quota system.

via www.theamericanconservative.com

November 28, 2012 | Permalink | Comments (0)

One Per Cent: Wireless network of cows to keep burps under control

I'd hate to be the IT guy fixing this network. By dropping electronic devices into the stomachs of cows and networking them together, researchers hope to reduce the climate-warming farts and burps they produce.

via www.newscientist.com

November 28, 2012 | Permalink | Comments (1)

Blaine Greteman Reviews "Speaking Of Race And Class: The Student Experience At An Elite College" | The New Republic

I KIND OF feel like I’ve been dropped on Mars,” muses a lower-income student from rural South Dakota as she recounts her trek to the exclusive world of Amherst in Elizabeth Aries’s timely new book. I know the feeling. I felt it in 1998, when I arrived at the gates of Merton College, Oxford, where I’d come as a Rhodes Scholar after graduating from Oklahoma State University. Compared to the fourteen other students in my graduating high school class in rural Oklahoma, I wasn’t exactly poor, but my selection for the scholarship was unlikely enough that the Chronicle of Higher Education put my picture and the vaguely insulting headline “Look Who’s Winning the Rhodes” on its cover. As one of my best friends from those days, an Alabaman, recently remarked, “I think we were the only two Rhodes/Marshalls who moved to Oxford from a trailer.” The distance between such worlds, as Aries writes, goes “well beyond the miles.”

via www.tnr.com

November 28, 2012 | Permalink | Comments (3)

Paul Krugman In Germany: An Audience That Loves To Hate Him | The New Republic

The relationship between the popular Times columnist and the dominant European economy has thus settled into a stable, if neurotic, pattern: Krugman attacks Germans for their economic habits and trashes their most beloved public officials; in response, Germans wince, complain, and then ask for more.

via www.tnr.com

November 28, 2012 | Permalink | Comments (1)

96% of Political Donations From Ivy League Faculty & Staff Went to Obama

CampusReform.org:  96% of Political Donations From Ivy League Faculty & Staff Went for Obama:

via taxprof.typepad.com

Maybe all these smart people are right and I'm wrong. But I think it's more that they hope something can work that can't. It is like we are building this giant boat that has a lot on it for everybody and can do everything a boat should do and more, except float. --TS

November 28, 2012 | Permalink | Comments (2)

The GOP’s Secret Leverage in the Fiscal Cliff Negotiations - Hit & Run : Reason.com

So is President Obama bluffing? We already have a pretty good clue to how the White House will act—not what the administration is saying now, but how it actually acted in 2010, the last time the Bush tax cuts were set to expire. Then, as now, doing nothing would have allowed tax rates to rise. And then, as now, the president insisted that he would not extend the Bush tax cuts for top earners. But he did anyway.

via reason.com

To call a bluff you need a lot of intestinal fortitude, which I would guess the GOP lacks. "GOP" is almost the opposite of intestinal fortitude. But we'll see. --TS

November 28, 2012 | Permalink | Comments (1)

The President is bluffing | Keith Hennessey

President Obama’s veto threat decision is not just about fiscal policy, and it’s not just about who gets blamed for a legislative failure.  It’s about whether the President wants to cause a recession in 2013 and hamstring his second term.  No matter what he or his advisors say, he cannot afford to take that risk.

via keithhennessey.com

November 28, 2012 | Permalink | Comments (0)