The Right Coast

Editor: Thomas A. Smith
University of San Diego
School of Law

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Wednesday, March 4, 2015

The Latest Clinton Scandal Is Quintessentially Hillary

Nobody who is familiar with the Clinton family can possibly be expected to believe this line. Vanity, as ever, is the Clintons’ meal ticket, and it is their downfall, too. Digging a little into the story today, Business Insider’s Hunter Walker recorded today that Clinton did not so much inadvertently continue to use her previous account as she had her team build and configure an alternative system over which she had full and unadulterated control. Not only did she end up sending her e-mails “from a personalized domain, clintonemail.com,” Walker confirms, but she took the first steps toward the establishment of this arrangement before she had even been approved by the Senate. The offending domain, Walker discovered, was “registered on the day of her confirmation hearing in January 2009.” For the next four years, she would use it exclusively — for communicating within the State Department, within her private organizations, and within her family and her group of friends. Thus did America’s top diplomat attend to her business on an unapproved server, through potentially unsecured channels, and without any external oversight whatsoever.

via www.nationalreview.com

I can't imagine it will matter. Laws are for the little people, as GR says.

March 4, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Indian rapist says women to blame for being sexually assaulted | euronews, world news

Indian women have only themselves to blame if they venture out at night and attract the unwanted attention of others, says one of the men convicted in the 2012 Delhi gang rape.

Mukesh Singh was the driver of the bus the night Jyoti Singh boarded with her friend after a night out at the cinema. The 23-year-old was raped and beaten with iron bars. She later died from her injuries in an incident that prompted widespread demonstrations across India and outrage around the world.

Speaking in an interview for a BBC documentary, Mukesh Singh says a girl is far more responsible for rape than a boy.

“A decent girl won’t roam around at 9 o’clock at night. Boys and girls are not equal. Housework and housekeeping is for girls, not roaming in discos and bars at night doing wrong things, wearing wrong clothes. About 20 per cent of girls are good.”

Had Jyoti not put up a struggle she would still be alive, he said.

“When being raped, she shouldn’t fight back. She should just be silent and allow the rape. Then they’d have dropped her off after ‘doing her’, and only hit the boy.”

Singh who denies involvement in the attack has been sentenced to death but is appealing the verdict.

via www.euronews.com

There you have it.

March 4, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Microsoft's Paul Allen says he's found sunken Japanese battleship Musashi

Tokyo: Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Paul Allen and his research team have found the wreckage of a massive Japanese World War II battleship off the Philippines near where it sank more than 70 years ago, he said Wednesday.

via www.smh.com.au

I bet the Octopus cost more than the Musashi.

March 4, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Supreme Court justices split in key challenge to Obamacare subsidies - The Washington Post

Supreme Court justices split along ideological lines Wednesday in questioning during the latest legal battle over the Affordable Care Act, making the outcome difficult to predict.

Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., who saved the act from a constitutional challenge three years ago, this time asked no questions that would betray his thoughts.

via www.washingtonpost.com

He's got a whole lot of calculatin' to do.

March 4, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Beauty standards, family values in China - Business Insider

Relationship expert Melissa Schneider, author of The Ugly Wife Is A Treasure At Homeshares the differences between China's beauty standards and our own.

via www.businessinsider.com

March 4, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Lost City Discovered in the Honduran Rain Forest

An expedition to Honduras has emerged from the jungle with dramatic news of the discovery of a mysterious culture’s lost city, never before explored. The team was led to the remote, uninhabited region by long-standing rumors that it was the site of a storied “White City,” also referred to in legend as the “City of the Monkey God.”  

via news-beta.nationalgeographic.com

pretty cool

March 4, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

7 Steps to Living a Bill Murray Life -- Vulture

So what’s it like to be me? You can ask yourself, What’s it like to be me? You know, the only way we’ll ever know what it’s like to be you is if you work your best at being you as often as you can, and keep reminding yourself: That’s where home is.

via www.vulture.com

Ok. But not everything is easy.

March 4, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Decades of human waste have made Mount Everest a ‘fecal time bomb’ - The Washington Post

“The two standard routes, the Northeast Ridge and the Southeast Ridge, are not only dangerously crowded but also disgustingly polluted, with garbage leaking out of the glaciers and pyramids of human excrement befouling the high camps,” mountaineer Mark Jenkins wrote in a 2013 National Geographic article on Everest

via www.washingtonpost.com

You really have to see a mountain in this condition to believe it. There are only so many places to camp ("bivouac") on your way up a mountain. These places are littered with little and sometimes big frozen human turds. Some are scattered along the way. Drop behind a convenient serac, and voila! Somebody, perhaps long ago, dropped off the Browns. So whatever, you add your little pile. For some reason, nobody wants to climb the more pristine peaks.

March 4, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

King v. Burwell — The VC’s Greatest Hits - The Washington Post

The arguments upon which the plaintiffs’ case are based were first aired on the VC in this post from September 2011.  Additional posts followed.  It doesn’t make sense to link to them all, but here are some of the highlights from  VC blogging on this case over the past few years.

via www.washingtonpost.com

March 4, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Obamacare case shows Congress often misses mark when writing legislation - The Washington Post

The outcome of the Supreme Court arguments about the new health-care law could turn on how to interpret a single hotly contested phrase in the massive bill. But the case has already highlighted this truism: Congress can sometimes be sloppy.

via www.washingtonpost.com

Congress can be very sloppy, but I'm not sure this is a case of sloppiness.

March 4, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

George Will: Stopping the IRS - Winston-Salem Journal: Columnists

Today, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments about whether the IRS' lawlessness has extended to its role in implementing the Affordable Care Act. The act says that federal subsidies shall be distributed by the IRS to persons who buy insurance through exchanges "established by the state." The act's logic and legislative history, as well as a forceful statement by one of its architects, professor Jonathan Gruber of MIT, demonstrate that this clear language was written to "squeeze" -- Gruber's word -- the states into establishing exchanges. But when 34 states did not establish them, the IRS began disbursing billions of dollars through federal exchanges.

The court probably will rule that the IRS acted contrary to law. If so, the IRS certainly will not have acted contrary to its pattern of corruption in the service of the current administration.

via www.journalnow.com

Well, let's hope so.

March 4, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

The Believers - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education

With each announcement, deep learning has nudged the notion of artificial intelligence back into the public sphere, though not always to productive ends. Should we worry about the robot revolution to come? Spoiler alert: not right now; maybe in 50 years. Are these programmers foolish enough to think they’re actually mimicking the brain? No. Are we on the way to truly intelligent machines? It depends on how you define intelligence. Can deep learning live up to its hype? Well …

via chronicle.com

March 3, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Is Your Penis Normal? There's a Chart for That | RealClearScience

Are you one of those men who constantly worries that your penis isn't of an adequate size? Then you may be suffering from "small-penis syndrome." (Yes, that's an actual medical term.) More likely, you are simply intrigued to know how your manhood measures up against the rest of humanity. Either way, whether you are anxious or merely curious, you may soon be able to ask your doctor to pull out a tape measure so he can definitively answer the question, "Hey doc, is my weiner big enough?"

via www.realclearscience.com

There's probably another line for RC readers. Above of course.

March 3, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Ukrainian/Russian Men $19/Hr

GTS (Glacier Technology Solutions LLC) - We are military contractors working directly with the US Marine Corps assisting them with their immersive simulation training program.

Currently, we are looking for role players of Ukrainian and/or Russian ethnicity and language skills. Need MEN ranging 18-65 years of age.

via sandiego.craigslist.org

From the local Craigslist. I guess the US Marines are getting ready. H/t LS

March 3, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Netanyahu Delivered Just What Obama Feared - NationalJournal.com

March 3, 2015 Congressional Republicans haven't had many victories in their lasting conflict with President Obama, but Tuesday brought one. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's somber, provocative speech to Congress checked all the boxes.

via www.nationaljournal.com

March 3, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (1)

Monday, March 2, 2015

First Ever Image to Show Light as a Wave and Particle at the Same Time

What you're looking at here is a major breakthrough. The image reveals a property of light that has never been witnessed before by human eyes, though we've long known about it. But at last, thanks in an ingenious imaging experiment, we can now see how light behaves as a wave and a particle at the same time.

via gizmodo.com

I guess there's nothing that says light can't look like that.

March 2, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

The U.S. Constitution Actually Bans Hillary's Foreign Gov't. Payola

The Washington Post reported last week that the tax-exempt foundation run by Bill and Hillary Clinton accepted money from seven foreign governments while Hillary served as U.S. Secretary of State (it’s unclear how much foreign money the organization accepted while Hillary was a U.S. Senator). Super shady, right? It’s worse than that, though, because Article I, Section 9 of the U.S. Constitution actually bans foreign payola for U.S. officials.

The constitutional ban on foreign cash payments to U.S. officials is known as the Emoluments Clause and originated from Article VI of the Articles of Confederation. The purpose of the clause was to prevent foreign governments from buying influence in the U.S. by paying off U.S. government officials.

via thefederalist.com

Seems like a good idea.

March 2, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Obama’s claim that Keystone XL oil ‘bypasses the U.S.’ earns Four Pinocchios - The Washington Post

President Obama, seeking to explain his veto of a bill that would have leapfrogged the approval process for the Keystone XL pipeline, in an interview with a North Dakota station repeated some false claims that had previously earned him Pinocchios. Yet he managed to make his statement even more misleading than before, suggesting the pipeline would have no benefit for American producers at all.

via www.washingtonpost.com

March 2, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Jeb Bush was very, very good at CPAC today - The Washington Post

Bush was, by far, the best that I've seen him in his just-started presidential campaign. Gone was the somewhat-bumbling, uncertain speech-giver. (He did make a weird reference to campaign finance law and an odd joke about the weather in Miami, for what it's worth.) In its place was a politician of conviction who had total command of who he was and what he believed.  CPAC is a win for Bush -- the first one in front of people who might actually vote in a Republican primary he's had.

via www.washingtonpost.com

March 2, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Garry Kasparov: Putin’s Culture of Fear and Death - WSJ

Vladimir Putin actually started, and ended, the inquiry while Boris’s body was still warm by calling the murder a “provocation,” the term of art for suggesting that the Russian president’s enemies are murdering one another to bring shame upon the shameless. He then brazenly sent his condolences to Boris’s mother, who had often warned her fearless son that his actions could get him killed in Putin’s Russia.

Hours after Boris’s death, news reports said that police were raiding his home and confiscating papers and computers. President Putin’s enemies are often victims and his victims are always suspects.

via www.wsj.com

March 2, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Eric Braverman Tried to Change the Clinton Foundation. Then He Quit. - Kenneth P. Vogel - POLITICO Magazine

The previously untold saga of Braverman’s brief, and occasionally fraught tenure trying to navigate the Clintons’ insular world highlights the challenges the family has faced trying to impose rigorous oversight onto a vast global foundation that relies on some of the same loyal mega-donors Hillary Clinton will need for the presidential run sources have said she is all but certain to launch later this year.

via www.politico.com

Iaeee chihuahua.

March 2, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Is Supreme Court's chief justice ready to take down ObamaCare? | TheHill

But it remains unclear which way Roberts will rule. The challengers argue that the plain English of a phrase in the law referring to marketplaces “established by the state” clearly prohibits subsidies from being disbursed on federally run exchanges not established by states.
 
The administration argues that is a nonsensical reading of one phrase that is contradicted by the rest of the law, which makes no mention of restricting subsidies only to some states.
 

via thehill.com

My guess is Roberts will vote to uphold the law and so will Kennedy. Just sayin'. But I could be wrong and I hope I am.

March 2, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

TaxProf Blog: McGinnis: Will Law School Applicants Return?

Technological change has reduced the demand for lawyers, at least at the price point law schools were delivering it. The technological shock has been of two kinds.

First, machine intelligence is beginning to substitute for lawyers, particularly at the low end of the legal profession. Document discovery is moving from human to machines. Legalzoom and similar services are encroaching on the production of simple documents, like many wills and trusts. And once machines get into an area, they dominate over time.

Second, machine intelligence is reducing the agency costs from which lawyers have benefited, General counsel, for instance, can keep better track of exactly what their outside counsel are doing, cutting down on slack. The information age reduces the information asymmetry between lawyers and many of their clients. [Chart: The Law School Tuition Bubble.]

via taxprof.typepad.com

March 2, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Poroshenko: Boris Nemtsov Killed Over Evidence Linking Russia To Ukraine Conflict

"He said he would reveal persuasive evidence of the involvement of Russian armed forces in Ukraine. Someone was very afraid of this ... They killed him," Poroshenko said in televised comments during a visit to the city of Vinnytsia.

via www.huffingtonpost.com

Totally believable.

February 28, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

The XX Committee | Russia

Besides, Russia’s return to atavism is more disturbing to Westerners than any ISIS madness. At a deep, if unstated level, Muslims acting like barbarians has been part of our script for so long that it fails to stir our fears except when it comes close, as in Paris recently. The only thing that’s shocking is how the madmen are capturing it all on YouTube now. But Russians are Europeans of a sort, they look rather like us, but they certainly don’t think and act like us, and this is disconcerting to Europeans, and many Americans, at a level that cannot be easily expressed. The white caveman of progressive nightmares is back, and his name is Vladimir Putin.

via 20committee.com

Read the whole thing. This guy is good.

February 28, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Hope dies last

As the situation in Ukraine continues to deteriorate, with the Russian military and its “rebel” minions never having honored the Minsk-brokered “ceasefire” for even an hour, something like low-grade panic is setting in among NATO capitals. Western elites have a tough time sizing up Putin and his agenda realistically, for reasons I’ve elaborated, and the situation seems not to be improving.

German has a delightfully cynical line, die Hoffnung stirbt zuletzt (hope dies last), that sums up much of the wishful thinking that currently holds sway in Berlin, Paris, and Washington, DC. As the reality that Putin knows he is at war against Ukraine, and may seek a wider war against NATO too, is a prospect so terrifying that thousands of Western diplomats and “foreign policy experts” would rather not ponder it, so they don’t.

via 20committee.com

February 28, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Will Looming Spikes Change Minds on Warming? : Discovery News

Humanity is about to experience a historically unprecedented spike in temperatures.

via news.discovery.com

February 28, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (1)

Cherry company owner kills self after drug operation found - NY Daily News

A cherry manufacturing king committed suicide in a Brooklyn factory after his business was exposed Tuesday as a “Breaking Bad”-style drug den, sources said.

“Take care of my kids!” Arthur Mondella, 57, screamed to his sister after locking himself in a bathroom at the Dell’s Maraschino Cherries company.

via www.nydailynews.com

February 28, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

For Asian Americans, a changing landscape on college admissions - LA Times

“Do Asians need higher test scores? Is it harder for Asians to get into college? The answer is yes,” Lee says.

Zenme keyi,” one mother hisses in Chinese. How can this be possible?

via www.latimes.com

February 28, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

The disappeared: Chicago police detain Americans at abuse-laden 'black site' | US news | The Guardian

“Homan Square is definitely an unusual place,” Church told the Guardian on Friday. “It brings to mind the interrogation facilities they use in the Middle East. The CIA calls them black sites. It’s a domestic black site. When you go in, no one knows what’s happened to you.”

via www.theguardian.com

February 28, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Leonard Nimoy, a pop culture force as Spock of ‘Star Trek,’ dies at 83 - The Washington Post

“Someday,” producer Gene Roddenberry said many decades ago, “I’m going to make a science-fiction series and put pointed ears on that guy.”

via www.washingtonpost.com

For a while, Mr. Spock was my role model.

February 28, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Can Elizabeth Warren be the new Ted Kennedy? - Opinion - The Boston Globe

Senator Elizabeth Warren knows what it takes to go viral — just turn left.

via www.bostonglobe.com

HI ya hi ya hy ya HI ya hi ya hi ya
mumble mumble mumble mumble
HI ya hi ya hy ya hi ya
HI ha hi ya hy ya hi ya

That should do it. She'll never win now.

February 28, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (1)

Who killed at CPAC, the GOP's red meat 2016 auditions? - LA Times

Here's what we learned: Bush has staying power, despite conservatives' suspicion that he's a closet moderate. Scott Walker, the governor of Wisconsin, is hot — the new more-conservative hope to stop the Bush juggernaut. Sens. Cruz (R-Texas) and Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) could rise if Walker stumbles. Chris Christie looks like a spent force. And Rand Paul is still Rand Paul.

via www.latimes.com

February 28, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

The Assassination of Boris Nemtsov - The New Yorker

Just after midnight on Friday, Boris Nemtsov, a fifty-five-year-old Russian opposition politician, was gunned down as he walked across a bridge just outside the Kremlin walls. A car drove past, shots rang out, and Nemtsov was killed by four bullets to the back. His body lay on the sidewalk as police, journalists, and colleagues rushed to the scene.​ The last assassination in Moscow was that of Stanislav Markelov, a human-rights lawyer, who, along with the journalist Anastasia Baburova, was killed outside a subway stop in 2009. Before that, it was the renowned journalist Anna Politkovskaya, who was murdered in her apartment building in 2006. It had been six years since such people were shot dead in Moscow.

via www.newyorker.com

February 28, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, February 27, 2015

Why Washington Power Players Are Flocking to Seminary School - NationalJournal.com

To the casual Washington observer, the path from partisan politics to theology might not be obvious, but it has nonetheless quietly become well trod. This past spring, former Mitt Romney adviser and longtime political operative Eric Fehrnstrom surprised colleagues by announcing he would pursue a master's in theological studies at Boston College. Like McCurry's degree, the credential Fehrnstrom is earning is academic—meaning that he isn't seeking to be ordained—and he continues to consult on political campaigns with the Shawmut Group. Over the summer, Matt Rhodes, a former spokesman for the House Budget Committee, left his position at the American Hotel & Lodging Association to follow a call to the seminary and ordained priesthood in the Episcopal Church.

via www.nationaljournal.com

Hopeful I guess.

February 27, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (3)

Driver who broke through Lake Minnetonka tells of 40 minutes of terror | Star Tribune

As the frigid water and ice chunks poured into the open window, the pickup truck plummeted to the bottom of Lake Minnetonka and Ryan Neslund felt the surge of panic and fear.

“I was doomed,” said the 35-year-old paraplegic.

via www.startribune.com

There is a God and He likes ice-fishing.

February 27, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monster black hole born shortly after big bang | Science/AAAS | News

All galaxies are thought to have supermassive black holes at their center. These start out small—with masses equivalent to between 100 and 100,000 suns—and build up over time by consuming the gas, dust, and stars around them or by merging with other black holes to reach sizes measured in millions or billions of solar masses. Such binge eating usually takes billions of years, but a team of astronomers was stunned to discover what is, in galactic terms, a monstrous baby: a gigantic black hole of 12 billion solar masses in a barely newborn galaxy, just 875 million years after the big bang. The researchers report online in Nature today that they were scouring through several astronomical surveys looking for bright objects in the very early universe called quasars, galaxies that burn very bright because their central black holes are consuming material so fast. The monster they found (depicted in this artist’s impression) is roughly 3000 times the size of our Milky Way’s central black hole. To have grown to such a size in so short a time, it must have been munching matter at close to the maximum physically possible rate for most of its existence. Its large size and rate of consumption also makes it the brightest object in that distant era, and astronomers can use its bright light to study the composition of the early universe: how much of the original hydrogen and helium from the big bang had been forged into heavier elements in the furnaces of stars.

via news.sciencemag.org

weird

February 27, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Surgeon: We Could Transplant Human Head in 2017

(Newser) – Italian surgeon Sergio Canavero said in 2013 that surgery to transplant a human head would be possible soon. Now he's set to announce a project to do just that, via a keynote lecture at the American Academy of Neurological and Orthopaedic Surgeons annual conference this June. He sees the procedure as being possible as soon as 2017 and believes it should be pursued as a means of saving people with, say, multi-organ cancer, reports New Scientist. But the obstacles loom so large—spinal cord fusion among them—that most surgeons the magazine contacted dismissed the proposal altogether. "There is no evidence that the connectivity of cord and brain would lead to useful sentient or motor function," a prominent surgeon said. But earlier this month, Canavero sketched out what he considers to be a viable procedure in Surgical Neurology International:

via www.newser.com

New body here I come. This is going to be so Awesome. Italy kinda gives me pause though.

February 27, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Net neutrality's stunning reversal of fortune: Is it John Oliver's doing? - CSMonitor.com

“John Oliver absolutely helped turn the tide in the net-neutrality debate,” says Aram Sinnreich, professor at Rutgers University’s School of Communication and Information in New Brunswick, N.J. “The FCC got flooded with an unprecedented number of citizen contributions to the policy discussions afterwards, that probably wouldn’t have happened to that extent otherwise.”

via www.csmonitor.com

That's just great. But this won't work with the courts.

February 27, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

American missionary kidnapped in Nigeria - CNN.com

Lagos, Nigeria (CNN)An American missionary in Nigeria has been kidnapped in what authorities call a "purely criminal" act.

via www.cnn.com

There's a Baptist sect or branch or something called the "Anti-Mission Baptists." I don't know, I but I guess that as per Calvin, they think it's all pre-destined anyway, so missions are a waste of time. You don't want to think about that too carefully.

February 27, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

China goes wild for Smith's research

Last week 5 count 'em 5 people in China downloaded my article on The Efficient Norm for Corporate Law, a good article if I say so myself. But what gives in China? Ah, the mysterious East.

February 27, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Comrades for Net Neutrality

oday’s vote by a bitterly divided Federal Communications Commission that the Internet should be regulated as a public utility is the culmination of a decade-long battle by the Left. Using money from George Soros and liberal foundations that totaled at least $196 million, radical activists finally succeeded in ramming through “net neutrality,” or the idea that all data should be transmitted equally over the Internet. The final push involved unprecedented political pressure exerted by the Obama White House on FCC chairman Tom Wheeler, head of an ostensibly independent regulatory body.

via www.nationalreview.com

It's up to the courts now.

February 27, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Obama to ban bullets by executive action, threatens top-selling AR-15 rifle | WashingtonExaminer.com

As promised, President Obama is using executive actions to impose gun control on the nation, targeting the top-selling rifle in the country, the AR-15 style semi-automatic, with a ban on one of the most-used AR bullets by sportsmen and target shooters.

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives this month revealed that it is proposing to put the ban on 5.56 mm ammo on a fast track, immediately driving up the price of the bullets and prompting retailers, including the huge outdoors company Cabela's, to urge sportsmen to urge Congress to stop the president.

via www.washingtonexaminer.com

H/t instapundit.

February 27, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Investigators probing for criminal activity with Lois Lerner’s missing emails - The Washington Post

The watchdog agency found the backed-up emails by consulting with IRS information-technology specialists, according to TIGTA Deputy Inspector General for Investigations Tim Camus.

“They were right where you would expect them to be,” he said at the rare late-night hearing, which lasted until about 10 p.m.

via www.washingtonpost.com

February 27, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

The fatal flaw in the Iran deal - The Washington Post

Bad enough. Then it got worse: News leaked Monday of the elements of a “sunset clause.” President Obama had accepted the Iranian demand that any restrictions on its program be time-limited. After which, the mullahs can crank up their nuclear program at will and produce as much enriched uranium as they want.

via www.washingtonpost.com

February 27, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Holman Jenkins: Obama’s Oil-by-Rail Boom - WSJ

He was lucky again on July 6, 2013. Thanks to various competing news stories (a plane crash in San Francisco, the Trayvon Martin shooting trial), Americans did not dwell on a fiery oil-train accident in Canada that killed 47. For if there’s one boom Mr. Obama can claim authorship of, it’s the oil-by-rail boom.

via www.wsj.com

February 25, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Mysterious East Coast flooding was caused by ‘unprecedented’ surge in sea level - The Washington Post

But global warming wasn’t the sole culprit. The study suggested a change in ocean currents coupled with persistent winds that pushed water into the region caused the spike — which may be the first of many. The seas are rising, Yin told The Post, but the ascent isn’t smooth or even. The mechanics of sea rise aren’t dissimilar to temperatures rising during spring. During some years, the weather gets warmer faster — but the general trend is upward.

via www.washingtonpost.com

Denier.

February 25, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

What ‘Parks and Recreation’ taught me about life - The Washington Post

As the cast of NBC’s long-running sitcom “Parks and Recreation” came together on-screen for a final hug last night, I started to cry in a way I haven’t since I was a child and my mother came to the last page of “These Happy Golden Years,” the final volume in Laura Ingalls Wilder’s “Little House” series. One of the special things about television is the opportunity to live alongside your favorite characters season after season. And if you’re particularly lucky, a series can come along precisely at the moment when you need it, showing you the world and life as it can be.

via www.washingtonpost.com

Maybe this only happens to chicks. I guess I was pretty sad when The Wire was over and I did cry during the opening of the first LOTR movie. So yeah.

February 25, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Jason L. Riley: Why Eric Holder Won’t Let Go of Ferguson - WSJ

Attorney General Holder accuses Americans of being afraid to talk honestly about race relations, then uses his office to scapegoat police departments for black pathology. The conversation that Mr. Holder wants to have about race assumes facts not in evidence. It is also the wrong message to send to the young black men responsible for so much violent crime. These lawsuits make excuses for behavior that ought to be condemned and distract from a much more consequential debate about black cultural attitudes toward work, marriage, parenting and the rule of law. What ails these black communities are the Michael Browns, not the Darren Wilsons. And Mr. Holder’s war on cops won’t change that.

via www.wsj.com

February 24, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (0)

YaleNews | Sunlight continues to damage skin in the dark

Exposure to UV light from the sun or from tanning beds can damage the DNA in melanocytes, the cells that make the melanin that gives skin its color. This damage is a major cause of skin cancer, the most common form of cancer in the United States. In the past, experts believed that melanin protected the skin by blocking harmful UV light. But there was also evidence from studies suggesting that melanin was associated with skin cell damage.

via news.yale.edu

Everything you thought was good is bad.

February 24, 2015 | Permalink | Comments (1)